Roasted Sweet Potatoes & Spiced Vegan Medley

In my household we do a lot of cooking. A lot. Most days one of us gets in the kitchen to prepare dinner from scratch and since we made the move to Romania, that pretty much happens seven days a week thanks to the distinct lack of vegan offerings beyond side dishes at most restaurants. That’s a lot of cooking for any household but doubly so when we both have small businesses to maintain so some days we try to keep it simple.

Ish.

It’s not always easy to eat fresh and healthy when you’re not in the mood to spend time in the kitchen, but if it’s important you find ways to do it. Right?

My go to is potatoes. On this night, it was sweet potatoes. Specifically, roasted sweet potatoes.

I saw a recipe online for this really amazing Moroccan spiced dish but I couldn’t find some of the ingredients so I improvised.

This recipe was time consuming but the oven did most of the work, baking the sweet potatoes until they were fork tender. It took about an hour because I found some giant potatoes that I failed to boil or pan roast before popping in the oven, but otherwise it was pretty easy going despite all the ingredients.

Speaking of ingredients, all you need is: sweet potatoes, onion, cannellini beans, smoked tofu, red bell pepper, garlic, vegan yogurt, dill, lemon, parsley, turnip with the greens.

I did another oil-free experiment with the remaining ingredients, adding the onion, turnip and peppers to the pot with just a tablespoon of water. It worked well but keep in mind that if you want to reduce the amount of oil/fat in your diet then you’ll have to keep an eye on the pan because you’ll have to add more to avoid burning and starting over. I added the smoked tofu next because when you let it get crispy on the edges it has an amazing smoky, salty flavor that means you won’t have to add more salt to the dish.

Another win-win!

Add the beans and let this cook until you get the results you want, about 5 minutes. This is where I added cumin, paprika and 1/2 diced jalapeno but feel free to add whatever favors you want. Finally, the turnip greens went in last because they don’t take much time to cook.

But a tip I found out while researching this recipe is this: bitter greens have a way of neutralizing spice in any dish so if you want it spicy, add more after the greens have started to wilt. Just drape this mixture over the cooked sweet potatoes and you’ve got a delicious, healthy and totally satisfying meal in about an hour.

If you decide to make it extra spicy like I did, you might want to make a yogurt sauce if you have dinner companions who can’t handle the heat. It was a simple mix of vegan yogurt, fresh dill & parsley, cumin, lemon juice and a pinch of Sriracha.

This meal was a hit with everyone and best of all, afterwards there was no bloating, over-stuffed feeling and you know

what that means…dessert!

When Life Gives You Bananas ~ Vegan Banana Bread

We’ve all been there, standing in the produce aisle deciding on whether you want to be a good adult and get just one or two bananas or more. But you are a grownup, one who eats their fruits & veggies daily. Then reality sets in and now you have half a bunch of uneaten, slightly overripe bananas that need to be eaten or tossed.

But who likes super soggy bananas? Not me. Definitely not me.

The adult in question was my husband and the bananas were three. So I mashed them all up with some vanilla extract and bourbon and gathered ingredients for banana bread. This recipe is so simple and quick that you’ll find yourself purposely not eating the bananas so you have a legit excuse to indulge.

Like any proper bread recipe you mix the dry and then the wet and then mix them together. All you need is flour, sugar, baking powder & soda, salt, a pinch of cinnamon and a dash of nutmeg. Cinnamon and nutmeg are optional but they really take this banana bread recipe to a whole new level.

Most banana bread recipes call for a cup or so of mashed up banana but my bread as SUPER moist because I used three. And because my mother-in-law owns an off-size loaf pan so I had to increase the recipe a little. Even still the bananas were plentiful and it made a really moist treat.

Mash the bananas.

Mix the dry ingredients together. Experiment with different spices like clove, nutmeg or allspice to change up the taste.

Mix wet ingredients (plant butter & sugar or oil & sugar) and then mix dry with wet until just blended. Banana bread isn’t a smooth dough so don’t worry about a few lumps.

As you can see it was incredibly long but my impromptu changes still filled out the pan nicely. And adding parchment paper to the pan meant it was easy to take out and slice for serving.

I didn’t add anything else to this banana bread recipe, other than walnuts, but sometimes a nice glaze will make a nice addition to turn this treat into the perfect vegan dessert.

Black Beans Vegan & Two Ways

Beans, I’ve learned, are a pretty controversial food when they don’t need to be. Beans are an excellent source of protein and fiber, and beans are also incredibly inexpensive which means you get a lot of meal for your buck. We all (mostly??) have our favorite beans, mine include black beans and garbanzo beans because they’re so flavorful and versatile.

Why am I spouting the benefits of beans? The simple answer is that I’ve become quite a bean advocate over the years, looking at it as a cheap and healthy way to cook. These days I love that there are so many beans when I get the urge for a burger or a patty or some kind of meatless balls. But when I tell people I’m having a black bean & corn taco, I get wicked side eye like I said I was eating toenails and cola. They’re missing out and that’s fine by me.

More for me!

I picked up a half kilogram bag of black beans at the market, soaked them and popped them into the slow cooker for most of the day until they were soft enough to enjoy and I only added salt, herbs and vegetable stock for flavor.

Once the beans were done, I chopped: onions, celery (leaves and all), bell peppers, corn and garlic. Get a good crisp on the vegetables before you add the beans to the mix, this will enhance the flavor of Dish #1, black bean stew.

 

Along with the black beans I added cumin, smoky paprika, cayenne pepper, jalapeno, oregano and thyme. Oh, and I took a can of vegan chili beans, sauce and all, and put them in the blender until they were thick and creamy…and I added that to the broth/bean mixture for a thick stew-y texture that made my mouth water.

Scoop it in a bowl and garnish it as you wish and Dish #1 is complete.

Dish #2 is based on one of my favorite things back in my college days. Chili Mac from Steak n’ Shake. About fifteen minutes from campus there was an all night restaurant and chili mac was an amazing distraction, reward or way to commiserate about something I thought was life or death at the time. Ah, the stressful ol’ days.

But I saw this cute lasagna style noodles in the pantry and I knew what to do with the leftover bean stew. Chili Mac!

All you need is noodles, jalapenos (okay, more jalapenos) and cheese (optional) and you’re ready to go.

 

This particular cheese was a vegan Gouda that smelled a lot like Gouda and it wasn’t too bad on the taste buds either. I only added a little to my plate but the Hubs ate it up. Twice!

Grab y our favorite ice cold beverage and enjoy.

Creamy Potato & Beer Stew

It’s no secret to anyone paying attention that my household is solidly a soup household. We don’t object to soup and there’s no such thing as too many days with soup on the menu, which is a good thing since the weather has already dipped into the negatives over the past few days.

The negatives y’all. Despite living in Europe for a few years now, my skin is squarely stuck in Los Angeles, trembling terribly under this ice cold weather. But the only thing good about this kind of cold is that nothing feels better after being out in the cold than piping hot soup. And I do mean piping hot. It’s a constant debate in our house because He likes it warm enough to enjoy but not burn his mouth and if it isn’t still steaming in my bowl, I’m not interested.

But this was no day for a light little vegetable soup so I decided to make a stew and I knew I wanted to add lentils so we have potato and lentil stew, which isn’t quite as simple as it sounds flavor-wise, but it’s pretty easy to make.

This recipe was based on a non-vegan recipe I came across in line at the supermarket in Austria though I’m sure I left out a few key ingredients aside from heavy cream and beef broth. I’m totally okay with that!

Making this soup is easy but it does require some prep which is often my weakness. I tend to chop the stuff I need first and then turn on the fire which means I’m always rushing to chop-dice-slice everything else before anything burns. But this time I actually remembered to remind myself to do all the prep first and it made all the difference.

What you’ll need: 6 potatoes, 1 fennel bulb, 1 parsnip, 2 leeks (just the white part), 10 garlic cloves, 1 cup yellow lentils, 1 brown beer, vegetable stock, cayenne pepper, smoked paprika, salt & pepper, basil, marjoram.

Get the lentils started cooking so everything comes together at the same time.

I used a splash of olive oil (cold pressed, extra virgin) to get a little bit of char on the first four ingredients and then I added the garlic and cooked for another 8 or so minutes before adding broth. Let the mixture cook until it’s soft and let cool so you can get a stick blender and make it nice and creamy.

Use the blender to get the potato-fennel mixture nice and soft and creamy. It tastes like there’s butter and cream in it, but there isn’t. It’s just the power of the potato. Now that you’ve got perfect smoothness, add the beer a 1/2 cup at a time plus the seasonings until you’re satisfied. Turn the heat back on until it’s hot and you’re ready to grub!

To serve, just add about a serving spoon of lentils right in the center.

No stew meal is complete without salad and thick, herby, buttery bread.

Fair warning; this recipe makes about 8 normal sized bowls of soup so be prepared to pig out or have leftovers for tomorrow!

Too bad I didn’t remember to get a photo of the beer but it was a dark hefe from Paulaner. Brown beer works best to me because I’m not a fan of IPA and blond beers aren’t my favorite. If you try a different beer, let me know how it turns out.

And don’t be shy about photos!

Totally Plant Based Mushroom Bourguignon!!

I have always been a big fan of mushroom. Stuff them with a bunch of savory flavors, grill’em up with onions and put them on a burger and I couldn’t be happier or add them to an Asian style soup and let me at it. But since adopting a plant based diet mushrooms and I have become close. Very close.

Why?

Mushrooms are thick and hearty, versatile and easy to cook. Plus they have this wonderful gift of taking on the flavors their cooked with so even a picky person like me doesn’t feel like I’ve had mushrooms for three days in a row. One of the things I really missed when we lived in Germany was the distinct lack of portobello mushrooms. When I did find them–that one time–I stocked up and when shroom crazy for a few days.

In Romania there has been no portobello sightings but there are plenty of crimini and oyster mushrooms and if you look very carefully you’ll find delicious chanterelle mushrooms which have become my second favorite over the past couple years. And since going vegan has in no way dimmed my love for all things French, today we have mushroom bourguignon!

I’ve made no secret of my love of wine, traveling or potatoes so this dish shouldn’t surprise you at all. And if you’ve ever tried the traditional version of this meal, you might think it’s more difficult than it is.

It’s not, trust me. Follow the instructions and use your judgment and you’ll be fine.

Oh and do your prep work ahead of time. You don’t want to be peeling and chopping once you need to get that wine down in the pan, unless you secretly moonlight as a TV chef.

Okay so the first thing  I did was clean and cut my mushrooms. I sliced the oyster mushrooms the long way so, when cooked, they have a texture similar to shredded “meat” and I chopped the crimini mushrooms so they were bigger to give the dish a bit more substance. I had to cook them in batches and you should too because mushrooms release a tremendous amount of liquid and you want to cook them until there’s a bit of crispiness around the edges.

I used olive oil and vegan butter to cook the mushrooms and I know it’s a big decadent and not as fatty as I would normally go but this is bourguignon and if you’re gonna do it, you must do it right-ish.

When the mushrooms are done, it took me about 15-20 minutes, set them aside and add another splash of oil and a pad of vegan butter into the pan and then add the shallots, carrots, celery and thyme sprigs and cook for 8 to 10 minutes. Toss in the garlic and I added chopped celery leaves because they are full of flavor and added a nice depth of flavor.

Now the hard parts are mostly done, I hope you’ve already peeled and chopped your potatoes because you’ll want everything finished at about the same time.

Once the garlic and celery leaves have cooked for a few minutes, it’s time to add tomato paste and red wine. I chose a local Romanian red wine, dry and full bodies, and it worked! Let the wine simmer until it reduces by about a third and then you can add the mushrooms and finish seasoning it to taste.

We paired this with the rest of the wine and of course, a neighbor contributed some cognac to the meal so we were all warm, toasty and totally full from a hearty meal with plenty of mashed potatoes. I would caution you to keep the mashed potatoes simple and let the bourguignon be the star of this show.

I should have let the carrots cook just a bit more, so make sure you give them enough time to cook before you add the wine. Luckily I don’t mind a few crunchy carrots in my food but it was a mistake on my part.

The wine made that mistake much easier to accept and it was the perfect buzz to help me get back to the writing cave!

A Lost Weekend in Cluj-Napoca

Those of you who have started reading and following this blog–thank all of you for encouraging me to keep doing this!–know that one of my biggest passions is traveling. That’s right, in addition to being a romance author, ghostwriter, political junkie and vegan foodie, I love to get away.

Anytime.

Anyplace.

And it turns out that Romania is full of hidden gems. Okay maybe they’re not all that hidden but this is my first time here so it’s all brand new to me and therefore feels a little hidden. But some friends that we met in Germany are now living back in their homeland and invited us for a visit to their town, Cluj-Napoca.

cluj napoca romanian

If you’re like me you’ve already paused to Google this city and you’ll find out like I did that it is a BIG city. I mean it’s not my hometown of Chicago or my adopted hometown of Los Angeles but at 400k people, it is way bigger than I expected. So big that instead of heading to the town’s website or Wikipedia, I immediately Googled “vegan cluj napoca” because I was jonesing for a night out with some good, chef made, vegan food.

Lo and behold, there was an option.

Samsara

 

The restaurant was minimalist but nice and sophisticated, none of which I really cared about. The food however, was pretty darn good. We ate there twice and I enjoyed a delicious Thai curry soup, lentil soup the next day, Asian style noodles and a curry dish. Before you ask, no it was a pretty eclectic restaurant with plenty of options, not all of which were vegan which I thought was nice since there was a meat lover dining with us.

The soup was delicious but the noodle dish was a tad salty. All in all it was a mixed bag of treats but if we lived in Cluj it would likely be our lazy night option.

Luckily food was a small part of this weekend. I got a chance to visit a section of the Carpathian Mountains, a mountain range called Apuseni Mountains that was beautiful. And cold.

It was a simple sightseeing trip meant to kill a few hours between catching up and talking business but when you come upon this view, staying in the car is not an option. So dressed in my red Converse All-Stars, I got out–and got wet–just to capture some gorgeous scenery up close and personal.

But like I said, it was cold. Very cold and we didn’t stay in one part of the range for very long but the climb up took us from autumn weather to deeply winter in just a few hundred meters.

And what is a tired and hungry vegan to do after a day in the mountains? Eat, of course.

Toulouse was an adorable little bistro style cafe with a long, dark pine bar and an impressive liquor selection. And oddly enjoy, for some reason American Top 40 was playing…from the nineties. I loved it!

The food was…okay. I was able to get fajitas which made me smile because Mexican is my second favorite cuisine to eat. The vegetables were hot and seasoned well but the tomatoes in the salsa were canned. It probably sounds horribly snobby of me but I never eat salsa that isn’t fresh, not since I learned how to make salsa in college. It’s just a quirk of mine and I don’t mind it because canned tomatoes are entirely too sweet for salsa. Plus the way salsa and lime juice tastes together with parsley and fresh garlic? Anyway so that kind of ruined it for me–a little–but I did eat up every bit of the mushroom, onion and pepper mix. I would have liked more than tortilla triangles because I can guarantee that when it comes to tacos or fajitas, I can be guaranteed to overeat. #truth

That other sauce is guac and I’ll tell you now that I gave it to my husband because there are three vegetables I do not like: avocados, beets and eggplant. I can be pretty fair with everything else, even kale, but those are on my ‘never ever’ list which is probably why the salsa bummed me out so much.

But rest easy, I had my all-time favorite vegetable to cheer me up. Potatoes.

The hubs got a chickpea curry dish that was tasty with just enjoy coconut cream to rub off some of the heat. I love the heat but he doesn’t so I only had a bite to taste. Okay, two bites. Three bites. I had three bites.

The fresh tomatoes added a nice hint of acid and freshness. If we had another day I probably would have come back to try it out.

You’re wondering where the drink is, right?

Well in this oddly international lunch, I decided why not keep up the tradition and ordered a Paloma.

A simple grapefruit soda & tequila drink, this cocktail went perfectly with the fajitas.

Spicy Broccoli & Tofu Noodles

One of my favorite things is noodles. Asian style noodles. I love them all from the delicious buckwheat taste of soba noodles to rice noodles (thick or thin) and of course, ramen. But I also adore Udon noodles, glass noodles, wok noodles and all the undiscovered noodles out there waiting for me. I. Love. Them.

And most of all, I keep a good stock in my pantry so that when I’m at a loss for what to make for lunch or dinner, or if I don’t feel like having what’s on the menu, I hunt down veggies and pantry staples, grab a pack of noodles and I’m good to go. That’s pretty much how this dish came to be.

The best part is that, despite how complicated the dish seems, it’s really simple to make. For the ramen, all you need is boiling water but be sure to read the instructions carefully because sometimes you boil them for a few minutes and others you let them sit in the water for about five minutes. These were the simple boil for three minutes and they’re done, but I really loved that these particular noodles had only three ingredients: rice flour, turmeric and water.

Turmeric! An amazing anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant that also provides increased brain function and helps stave off brain diseases.

I just used what i had on hand which was a half floret of broccoli, half a brick of tofu, onion, red bell pepper, garlic and ginger. I topped it with sliced scallions and these amazing purple sprouts that were beet sprouts which I found surprisingly delicious considering that beets are one of about three vegetables that my taste buds don’t like.

For this recipe I did use oil, cold pressed olive oil BUT just a half tablespoon which I heated and mixed with the ginger, garlic and two types of curry. As soon as that hearty aromatic scent hit the air, add the vegetables. You can add the tofu last but I cooked it separately in a small skillet so brown it around the edges.

TIP: Give your tofu extra flavor by cutting and marinating it. For this recipe I used soy sauce, garlic powder and curry. I did it first so it sat getting flavorful while I chopped and did everything else.

This is yet another thing I love about Asian cuisine, you can fancy it up or enjoy a quick and rustic style meal. And if you’re a picky vegetable eater you’re not beholden to anyone’s recipe, just use what you already have on hand.

I’m sure you’re wondering where the ‘spicy’ in this recipe came from and the answer is mostly the pinch of red curry and the half Thai chili pepper I used but I removed the seeds because I LOVE it spicy but the hubs…doesn’t. So in the spirit of compromise I just decorated my plate with a bit of Sriracha. Okay, more than a bit.

Sue me, I like it spicy!

Let me know your favorite noodle dish and I just might make it!

Plant Based Gnocchi with Squash & Turmeric Cream

Some days you want to whip up something easy for dinner and you reach for one of those tasty vegan burgers that only require you to add your favorite fixings and on other days you feel like channeling your inner professional chef and getting all up in the kitchen and whipping up something wonderful.

Enter, gnocchi. I LOVE gnocchi because I am a potato-a-holic and proud of it. I don’t eat it nearly enough but when I do, I devour it like a starving woman finally getting a meal in her belly. In fact when I bought this gnocchi it wasn’t even on the shopping list but there it was and I knew it would be a perfect meal to whip up when you least expected it. And it sat on a shelf for a week, maybe two untouched.

Then we realized–too late–that we were a day late on a trip to the market and…Eureka! I reminded the hubs that we had gnocchi in the pantry, squash in the veg bowl and plenty of ingredients for at least three different sauces.

Which did he choose? Squash, of course.

In our house we love all types of squash although that wasn’t always true for my husband who used to consider it ‘pig’s food’. One day back in 2006 or 2007 I made a butternut squash soup and he was a changed man. As proof of that, this was one of his dishes.

Hokkaido squash is a small orange squash that is easy to cut with minimal fuss. It tastes delicious and it blends well with plenty of different dishes, savory or sweet. Not to mention it is low calorie (just 80 calories per 1 cup!), high in fiber, potassium and folate which means pregnant ladies should gobble it up all year round!

Once you cut up the squash you can use any cooking method you wish but we boiled it until soft and then added the squash to a food processor along with plenty of herbs & spices. Add a splash of coconut milk to give it the creamy sauce-like texture and you can use this with anything. In fact, this is one of my go-to options when I’m in the mood for vegan mac & cheese.

Since we try to keep meals mostly healthy, this dish had mushrooms, onions and bell peppers because we had a few of each on hand. Saute them up however you like but for this particular recipe the hubs used water because he is dedicated to limiting our oil intake wherever he can. It works like a charm and I swear, unless you love the taste of oil, you won’t know the difference!

Turmeric, basil, salt & black pepper and coconut cream completed the ingredients for the sauce, giving it a thick and hearty taste that’s perfect when the temp drops to the single digits.

Mushrooms are the perfect way to give your vegan dishes a hearty ‘meaty’ feel that will satisfy your appetite without giving you a big fat food baby.

Sadly we didn’t have a cocktail to go with this meal but I think warm tuica or maybe even a mulled wine would be the perfect addition to this dish to keep you warm.

Taco Tuesday Vegan Style ~ Spicy Taco Salad

I know we’re a day early for Taco Tuesday but we’re doing this. TODAY.

I don’t know about you but I’ve been doing some form of taco Tuesday since college but let’s be honest every day of the week was Taco Thursday or Pizza Monday or whatever…you get the idea, right? Well now, as an adult, I appreciate tacos as much as ever–7 years living in southern California solidified it–but I don’t always appreciate all the extra calories that come from taco shells.

Maybe I eat too many tacos. Maybe.

Possibly.

Who can really say?

In case you’re wondering I DO love a hard shell tortilla and it’s a plus they’re vegan. But if you knew how many I could eat then you’d understand why I salad-ified my go to Mexican dish.

This is a pretty easy dish to make especially if you opt to use beans, which I did. Or tofu crumbles, which I also did.

Told ya, I can be a bit of a pig under the right circumstances!

Seriously though, this recipe is pretty easy because you cook everything on its own.

Brown rice
Chop, rinse & spin lettuce
Saute onion, bell pepper & mixed garlic
Homemade salsa with tomatoes, jalapenos, parsley, lime juice and tequila
Slice or halve olives
Chop avocado (optional)
Top with sliced jalapeno peppers

Then…the fun part. Loading it up!

Be sure to rinse the lettuce in cold water so you keep a nice crunch with every bite!

The thing I love about this dish, besides its simplicity, is that it’s healthy and packed with veggies. If you use fresh salsa, which I recommend, you get ALL the nutrients from tomatoes, onions, parsley, lime juice, scallions, garlic, bell pepper and all the herbs and seasoning which includes: chili powder, cayenne pepper, cumin, salt & pepper and oregano. It’s jammed packed with flavor and good stuff for your body.

Feel free to omit the 1/2 shot of tequila too. I don’t always use it but I do love the flavor it adds to a really good salsa. Up the lime juice if you want more acidity without the alcohol or go really crazy and mix lemon and lime juice.

Or just do a shot and enjoy your salad with ice cold beer or water.

I prefer both because good skin doesn’t happen without lots of water.

I’ve been experimenting with filters…what do you think? Leave your comments below!

Homemade Vegan Broth: A Novel Way To Use Veg Scraps

As a hardworking vegan you’re used to spending time each day chopping, slicing, dicing and whatnot to all of your veggies. It’s part of cooking and when you eat a plant based diet you’ll spend a good deal of meal prep doing just that. And when this is what you wake up to…

…you’re really grateful for the foresight of taking all those bits of what most people consider trash and dumping them in a slow cooker.

After making a quick stir-fry with some homemade teriyaki sauce, I remembered this video I saw on Facebook a few months ago about how to use your discarded food for broth and I decided, why not?

As you can see there were the hard outer leaves of a very big leek, odds and ends of a red bell pepper, butts of carrots, garlic & broccoli tips and steams and once the idea struck, I added a few thick slices of ginger because it has tons of health benefits and because it’s delicious. This was super easy to make too!

Just add enough water to cover the veggies, salt and pepper and you’re good to go.

Or…

You can add a few more things like I did because, why not? Black peppercorns, coriander, cloves, star of anise and a couple bay leaves all went into the pot before bed. I set it on low and let it cook until about 2 or 3 in the afternoon the following day. To be fair, it did need another pinch of salt but I let it slide because I planned to add soy sauce to the dish I planned to make.

What else but…soup?

I was very impressed with how clear the broth came out. It has been a lifelong struggle as a home cook and foodie, to make a beautiful clear, non-cloudy broth and finally I’ve done it. By accident.

This soup was very simple too with only a few ingredients: rice noodles, bean sprouts, fresh parsley and sriracha. Now you can see why I just added a couple splashes of soy sauce and lime. Clean, delicious and simple flavors.

But we are also adults in need of sustenance so we added these delicious veggie balls that were made of lentils, carrots, onion, bread crumbs, chia seeds and garlic. I didn’t make them, I bought them and they were pretty damn good. Add a pinch of garlic granules and cracked black pepper and stick’em in the oven for five to 10 minutes so they’re good and crispy on the outside, and then drop them on top of the soup and get your EAT ON!

I’ll grant you it’s not the prettiest dish around, not even with my totally avant garde sriracha drops on the side but it wasn’t a planned meal and it still turned out great. And goodness, that broth, how amazing does it look?

Now that I’m done patting my back over the broth, let’s talk about what I washed this soup down with because the answer is beer. Ice cold Tsingtao that I just happened to have on this chilly day…talk about kismet!

 

What do you drink beside your favorite soup?