Seitan Gyro Bowl & Tofu Tzatziki

Since I have a lot of time on my hands, being mostly stuck indoors these days, I’ve developed quite the fascination with seitan. You can make all manner of vegan proteins from sausages to steaks, ribs, burgers and patties. If you have a proper spice rack, worthy of a grown up vegan, you won’t have to worry about a thing.

There are tons of seitan recipes online and you can switch up the seasoning to get whatever type of cuisine you prefer.

The seitan recipe I use is pretty simple: 30 grams of gluten flour, 7 grams nutritional yeast, herbs & spices as desired, oil and water. Mix dry ingredients first and taste, add more seasoning as needed. Then mix in wet and shape into whatever food you want. Wrap it in foil and simmer for 45 minutes and that is it.

Now, the rest of the bowl is even easier. Sauteed oyster mushrooms, bell peppers and onion with Greek or Mediterranean seasoning if you want to achieve that classic gyro flavor. Add a grain like rice or bulgur and you’re good to go!

And we can forget the famous cucumber yogurt sauce known as tzatziki sauce. The market was out of my favorite veggiegurt last week so I had to improvise and I did, using left over tofu in brine. I took the tofu, mint, lemon zest and juice, parsley and basil to make a cooling agent, though it wasn’t spicy so cooling wasn’t quite the goal just…flavor.

You can skip this sauce if you want or you can enhance the spice so you can truly enjoy it properly.

This is by no means an authentic dish, but it’s no secret that I can turn pretty much any cuisine into a Buddha bowl!

What’s your favorite Buddha Bowl?

Colorful Vegan Buddha Bowl

Sometimes you just want a Buddha bowl. At least I do.

And when I want a Buddha bowl, I can go a little crazy with piling veggies onto the plate. I make no apologies.

The key to making a proper bowl is prep work. And an awesome spice rack.

The first step is to pull out all the ingredients you’ll need so you have some semblance of organization as you move forward. I wanted distinct flavors that blended well so I started with the ingredients with the longest cook times; sweet potatoes, cauliflower and carrots. Toss them with oil or vegan yogurt and seasoning and toss them into a pre-heated oven.

We have lots of colorful veggies with the carrots and sweet potatoes but we can’t forget the most important color: dark leafy greens.

Okay, maybe Bok Choy isn’t all that dark green but it is packed with nutrients and it is super delicious. Saute with leeks, ginger and garlic, a flavor profile that will combine with just about any cuisine style you choose. And then, if you must have grains…have your grains! I added about 60 grams of bulgur to this recipe because I always feel better with some grains on my plate.

Sauces are mandatory and I don’t always make one when I make a Buddha bowl but the carrots came with really amazing greens and there was basil and mint in the fridge, so I added lemon and capers and vegan yogurt for a refreshing sauce that allowed me to add a bit more spice to the different vegetables in the bowl.

Toss it all into the food processor and let’em rip. It’s worth the extra step, I swear!

Don’t make the same mistake I did and ignore the timers or you’ll end up with slightly charred bits of vegetables. It was still tasty but I’d rather not eat charcoal, if you know what I’m saying.

Buddha bowls can take time but I promise that prep work will be your best friend at the end of the day. And you don’t have to add quite so many vegetables as I did, but ever since I started using Chronometer, I’m obsessed with hacking my diet to get a greater variety of nutrients to each plate. The best part of all is that the oven does most of the work, the bulgur cooks in 10 minutes which gives you about 15 to properly saute your favorite dark leafy greens.

It’s an hour well spent in the kitchen in my opinion but if you want to chop that time in half, skip the greens and the grains…but seriously, don’t skip either. Your body needs them.